Designing effective team-learning environments in the engineering curriculum

Posted on February 01, 2019


Patricia Sheridan

Thursday February 28, 2019, 11:30 am
Mitchell Hall, Room 225

Invited Speaker: Patricia Sheridan, Associate Director – Undergraduate Curriculum at the Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering (ILead) at the University of Toronto.

Abstract:
Competence in teamwork is a mandated requirement of graduating engineers. However, students are often expected to learn teamwork implicitly through their design projects and clubs. These experiences can result in minimally-controllable experiences that leave students resentful of the courses that include team projects and ill-equipped to work effectively in industry design teams post-graduation. Over the past 8 years, Patricia has both researched and instructed on effective team-learning in engineering design, and used leadership as a base for developing more industry-ready engineering graduates. This talk will discuss some strategies and tools used to incorporate explicit leadership and team learning into the engineering design classroom, how the Teamworks self- and peer-feedback system supports student learning, as well as lessons learned about student understanding of effective teamwork from her research.

Bio:
Patricia Sheridan is the Associate Director – Undergraduate Curriculum at the Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering (ILead) at the University of Toronto. Her teaching focuses on integrating teamwork and leadership learning into existing engineering courses, and her research focuses on creating effective team-learning environments in diverse student populations. She has previously taught leadership and teamwork courses at Northwestern University, where she is a Leadership Fellow. She is a co-developer of the Teamworks online team learning system and a co-recipient of the Alan Blizzard Award for collaborative teaching from STLHE. Patricia holds a BASc and MASc in Mechanical Engineering, and a PhD in Engineering Leadership Education.

Download the presentation (PDF, 2 MB)