If you're looking for online courses this summer to complement your degree or get ahead in your studies, consider one of our selection of online courses currently offered this summer.

Online Courses for Summer 2021

APSC 174: Introduction to Linear Algebra

Systems of linear equations; real vectors spaces and subspaces; linear combinations and linear spans; linear dependence and linear independence; applications to systems of linear equations and their solution via Gaussian elimination; bases and dimension of real vector spaces; linear transformations, range, kernel and Rank-Nullity theorem; matrix representation of a linear transformation; composition of linear transformations and matrix multiplication; invertible matrices and determinants; eigenvalues and eigenvectors of square matrices. Applications of the course material to engineering systems are illustrated.

  • APSC 174 Details

    Credits: 3.3
    Instructor: Mohebbi, Mahdi

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Solve parametrized or unparametrized systems of linear equations using Gaussian elimination and back substitution; they will be able to write the augmented matrix of a given system of linear equations, transform it into reduced or row-reduced echelon form using a sequence of elementary row operations, and finally solve the system using back substitution. They will be able to determine the number of solutions as a function of the parameter in case the system of linear equations is parametrized.
    2. Perform basic matrix algebraic operations (addition, scaling, multiplication).
    3. Understand the notions of eigenvalue, eigenspace, and eigenvector for a given vector space endomorphism; in particular, given a real n √ó n matrix, they will be able to compute the set of all eigenvalues of that matrix, as well as eigenvectors or bases for the eigenspaces corresponding to those eigenvalues.
    4. Compute the determinant of a real n √ó n matrix and know its main properties; in particular, they will be able to use the determinant in assessing whether or not a given n √ó n matrix is invertible.
    5. Prove linear algebraic results for general vector spaces; these proofs will require mathematical reasoning, will be expressed in precise mathematical language with full mathematical rigor, and will combine various notions seen in different parts of the course, such as vector subspace, linear span, linear independence, linear mapping, and eigenvalue/eigenspace/eigenvector.
    6. Understand the mathematical notion of a real vector space, and will be able to determine whether or not a given subset of a real vector space is a vector subspace; in particular, students will be able to work with vector spaces other than the usual Euclidean space Rn.
    7. Understand the notions of linear combination and linear span of a family of vectors, and will be able to determine whether or not a given vector is in the linear span of a given family of vectors.
    8. Understand the notions of linear dependence and independence of a family of vectors, and will be able to determine whether or not a given family of vectors in a vector space is linearly independent.
    9. Understand the notions of basis and dimension of a vector space; they will be able to compute a basis for a given vector space, and use it to compute the dimension of the vector space.
    10. Understand the notion of a linear mapping between vector spaces; in particular they will be able to determine whether or not a given mapping between vector spaces is linear.
    11. Understand the notions of kernel and image of a linear mapping; in particular, they will be able to compute the kernel and image of a given real matrix, and they will understand the precise relation between the kernel/image of a real matrix and its column vectors.

APSC 182: Applied Engineering Mechanics

Identification, visualization and quantification of forces on elements and forces within statically determinate engineering structures and systems. Two- and three-dimensional force equilibrium of rigid bodies; force distribution within engineering systems like simple trusses, frames and machines; internal shear forces and bending moments in force carrying elements; and engineering stress and strain.

  • APSC 182 Details

    Credits: 1.7
    Instructor: Macdougall, Colin

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Draw free-body diagrams.
    2. Identify equations of equilibrium.
    3. Solve trusses.
    4. Calculate internal forces.
    5. Create shear force and bending moment diagrams.
    6. Solve a frame.
    7. Evaluate stresses and strains.
    8. Calculate displacements.

APSC 199 English Proficiency for Engineers

This course develops skills that are necessary to organize and present technical information in a professional context. At the end of the course students will demonstrate English proficiency in listening comprehension and written expression.

APSC 221: Economics and Business Practices in Engineering

This course will provide the student in the Engineering program with the ability to appropriately incorporate selected economic and business practices into the practice of engineering. The practices covered include: business planning for the enterprise, enterprise economic analysis, project management process, project economic analysis, risk analysis and management, quality management and change management. Assignments and examples are based on situations from engineering based industries.

  • APSC 221 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Sneep, Jan

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to solve economic analysis problems:

    1. Cost concepts and use a variety of cost estimation techniques.
    2. Time value of money and solve cash flow analysis problems.
    3. Compare a variety of projects using multiple economic approaches.
    4. The effect of taxes on project viability and apply to appropriate cash flow analysis.
    5. Replacement analysis concepts and apply appropriate cash flow analysis to correctly determine minimum equivalent annual costs.
    6. The effect of inflation on project viability and apply to appropriate cash flow analysis.
    7. Apply a variety of approaches for dealing with uncertainty and risk associated with projects.
    8. Risk management approaches associated with project management.
    9. Change management from an organizational behaviour perspective.
    10. Recognizing new business opportunities and techniques for generate ideas.
    11. Feasibility Analysis.
    12. Assessing a new venture’s financial strength and viability.
    13. Writing a business plan.
    14. Basic management processes and concepts.

APSC 250: Biology Through an Engineering Lens

This course provides an introduction to biology and biochemistry, and their applications in cell-based engineering systems and processes. Students will obtain a basic background in biology, including the biology of bacteria, fungi, viruses and human cells. These concepts will be related to applications relevant to modern engineering and will be taught from a systems engineering perspective through the lens of societal need. This will include such applications as; bioremediation for the treatment of waste water, production of vaccines, biomedical and biomechanical devices, and regenerative medicine. While taught from an engineering perspective, the course would be relevant to any student interested in the application of biology, and is designed to provide relevant examples across multiple disciplines. The course assumes basic first year level science knowledge.

  • APSC 250 Details

    Credits: 3.5
    Instructor: Koupaie, Ehssan Hosseini

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Explain major cellular processes and mechanisms in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
    2. Describe the interrelationships between cells and organisms and their environment.
    3. Describe the relationship between structure and function on a molecular, cellular and system level.
    4. Apply knowledge on biological systems to solve engineering problems of relevance to society.

    Exclusion: CHEE 229

APSC 877: Engineering Project Management

This is a Graduate course and therefore it is no information listed in our Undergraduate calendar The course will examine the essential skills and knowledge required for effective engineering project management. The foundational principles of project management including integration, scope, cost, time, human resources, stakeholders and procurement are examined. The course will be delivered online. New, with Darya Duma as the Adjunct, May/June 2021.

  • APSC 877 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Duma, Darya

    Exclusions: MECH 896, APSC 223

ELEC 274: Computer Architecture

Number and data representation. Logical structure of computers. Instruction set architecture. Instruction execution sequencing. Assembly-language programming. Input/output interfaces and programming. Processor datapath and control unit design. Semiconductor memory technology and memory hierarchy design.

  • ELEC 274 Details

    Credits: 4.0
    Instructor: Manjikian, Naraig

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Understand instruction set architecture to support arithmetic, memory-access, and program branching operations.
    2. Understand internal semiconductor memory architecture and the design of basic cache and memory organizations.
    3. Use register-transfer notation to specify cycle-by-cycle logic behavior of instruction execution in a basic five-stage processing unit.
    4. Write a subroutine-based assembly-language program for specified data processing and input/output operations.

    Prerequisites: APSC 142 or APSC 143 or MNTC 313, ELEC 271 or MTHE 217 (MATH 217) or permission of instructor.
    Exclusion: CISC 221

ELEC 280: Fundamentals of Electromagnetics

A study of the fundamental aspects of electromagnetic fields. The following topics are covered: the Maxwell's equations and the 3-dimensional wave equation for transmission lines; vector analysis, including orthogonal coordinate systems, and the calculus of field quantities; electrostatic fields including the concepts of electric potential, capacitance, and current and current density; magnetostatic fields including inductance; time-varying fields and the complete form of Maxwell's equations; basic transmission line phenomena including steady-state sinusoidal behavior and standing waves, transient performance and impedance matching.

  • ELEC 280 Details

    Credits: 3.75
    Instructor: TBA

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Determine electrostatic fields using Coulomb's law and Gauss's law.
    2. Determine magnetostatic fields using Biot-Savart's law and Ampere's law.
    3. Calculate voltage or current across transverse electromagnetic (TEM) transmission lines.
    4. Calculate the induced voltage in time-varying electromagnetic fields using Maxwell's equations.
    5. Analyze the transmission line parameters and calculate transient voltage and current of the transmission line.
    6. Calculate the gradient, divergence, and curl of various scalar and vector fields.
    7. Calculate and describe the motion of systems in simple harmonic motion such as mass-spring systems and simple pendulums.
    8. Describe and calculate the motion of transverse and longitudinal waves, and work with basic wave phenomena such as superposition, reflection, standing waves, beats and the Doppler effect.

    Prerequisites: APSC 112 or APSC 114, APSC 171, APSC 172, APSC 174

ELEC 299: Mechatronics Project

A team design project based around an autonomous, programmable, robotic vehicle, following on from project activity in APSC 200. Students explore different sensors and software strategies for vehicle control and navigation, in addition to wiring up sensor and motor circuits. The design goal is to configure and program a vehicle to take part in a year-end competition in which robots compete head-to-head on a pre-defined playfield under established competition rules. A final project report must be produced that documents the experimentation, design, and testing. A final exam tests knowledge of sensors and software.

  • ELEC 299 Details

    Credits: 1.5
    Instructor: Frank, Brian Matthew

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Design an electromechanical hardware and software system to control a robotic vehicle to achieve a specified competitive task.
    2. Select and control sensors, motors, microcontrollers, and wireless systems in a single mechatronic system.
    3. Develop, test, and debug in a high-level language to sense/control a microcontroller output.
    4. Using basic electrical/electronic test equipment, perform hardware testing and debugging.
    5. Effectively communicate technical ideas in a formal report.
    6. Work effectively in a team.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 221, ELEC 271
    Corequisites: ELEC 252, ELEC 280

ELEC 326: Probability and Random Processes

This course provides an introduction to probabilistic models and methods for addressing uncertainty and variability in engineering applications. Topics include sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, conditional probability, independence, discrete and continuous random variables, probability density and cumulative distribution functions, functions of random variables, and random processes.

  • ELEC 326 Details

    Credits: 3.5
    Instructor: TBA

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Describe different types of random variables and identify important distributions.
    2. Discuss the law of large numbers and asymptotic behaviours, and the concept of information and entropy.
    3. Characterize and identify distribution of functions of multiple random variables and well-known random and point processes.
    4. Apply probability theory for modeling uncertainties involved in engineering problems.
    5. Solve problems involving probably with conditional probabilities.
    6. Calculate different statistics of random variables by manipulating one and two random variables and working with joint distributions.

    Prerequisites: APSC 171
    Exclusions: MTHE 351 (STAT 351)

MECH 221: Statics and Solid Mechanics

Review of statics, forces and equilibrium, internal forces in simple structures and other material from first year. Further development of axial, torsion, shear and bending moment diagrams, and concepts of stress and strain. Introduction to mechanical properties of materials, centroids and moments of areas, axial stress, flexural stress, transverse shear stress, calculation of displacement by integration, combined loading, and stress transformation. This course is designed primarily for mechanical engineering students.

  • MECH 221 Details

    Credits: 4.0
    Instructor: Pilkey, Keith

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Draw a free-body diagram with unknown external and/or internal forces, bending moments and/or torques and apply equations of equilibrium to solve for unknown external and/or internal forces, moments and/or torques.
    2. Determine the shear force equations (diagrams) for a beam.
    3. Determine the bending moment equations (diagrams) for a beam.
    4. Calculate the 2D strain state (normal and/or shear components) from a known amount of deformation.
    5. Calculate the 2D stress state (normal and/or shear components) at a given point from a combination of applied normal forces, shear forces, moments and/or torques.
    6. Determine the torsional shear stress and angle of twist at a given location in a shaft with circular cross-section subject to applied torques.
    7. Calculate the first and/or second moments of area for a complex cross-section.
    8. Determine the slope and deflection equations for a beam.

    Prerequisites: APSC 111, APSC 171, and APSC 182 or permission of instructor.
    Exclusions: CIVL 220, CIVL 230

MECH 241: Fluid Mechanics I

An introductory course in fluid mechanics. Topics include properties of fluids, fluids at rest, manometers and other pressure measuring devices, dimensional analysis, the laws of conservation of mass and momentum, Bernoulli's equation for incompressible flow and the energy equation, flow measurements, elementary pipe flow problems including losses, pumps, etc. On completion of the course students will be able to: Explain Bernoulli based energy equations with reference to energy and hydraulic grade lines, static and dynamic pressure; Explain control volume and control mass analysis with reference to Eulerian and Lagrangian frames, applied forces and flows; Solve simple flow systems for velocity distributions using continuity and Navier Stokes equations with appropriate boundary conditions; Solve flow and force problems in an integral framework using Bernoulli, conservation of mass and momentum; Solve piping system performance problems using Bernoulli with friction, minor losses, pump and turbine performance curves; Calculate pressures and forces on submerged surfaces in a static fluid; Solve scaling problems using dimensionless groups.

  • MECH 241 Details

    Credits: 3.5
    Instructor: TBA

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Solve scaling problems using dimensionless groups.
    2. Explain control volume (CV) and control mass analysis with reference to Euleria and Lagrangian frames, applied forces and flows.
    3. Solve simple flow systems for velocity distributions using continuity and Navier Stokes (NS) equations with appropriate boundary conditions.
    4. Calculate pressures and forces on submerged surfaces in a static fluid.
    5. Solve flow and force problems in an integral framework using Bernoulli, conservation of mass and momentum.
    6. Explain Bernoulli-based energy equations with reference to energy and hydraulic grade lines, static and dynamic pressure.
    7. Solve piping system performance problems using Bernoulli with friction, minor losses, pump and turbine performance curves.

    Prerequisites: APSC 111

MTHE 225: Ordinary Differential Equations

This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations and their applications to the natural and engineering sciences. Specific topics include first order differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear equations. Note: This course is being offered through the Faculty of Arts and Science.

  • MTHE 225 Details

    Credits: 3.5
    Instructor: TBA

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Solving basic initial value problems.
    2. Solving linear constant coefficient differential equations.
    3. Computing Laplace and inverse Laplace transforms.
    4. Using the Laplace transform to solve differential equations.
    5. Modeling a mass-spring-damper system or RLC circuit using differential equations.
    6. Modeling interconnected fluid reservoirs using differential equations.

    Prerequisites: APSC 171, APSC 172, APSC 174

MNTC P01: Engineering Mathematics

This course provides a detailed introduction to the fundamentals of calculus and linear algebra as applied to engineering applications. The purpose of the course is to provide a mathematical foundation for students pursuing upper-year engineering-related courses. The course covers topics such as derivatives, implicit differentiation, partial derivatives, integrals, first-order and higher-order linear ordinary differential equations, fundamentals of Laplace transforms, matrices and matrix inverses, solving systems of linear equations, vector spaces, orthogonality, and determinants. Topics are introduced by way of engineering examples.

  • MNTC P01 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Silverberg, Angie

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Express and use the tangent/slope and rate of change meanings of the derivative in single variable differential calculus.
    2. Construct application models from word problems and use derivatives to investigate properties of the models in single variable differential calculus.
    3. Express and use the relationship between integration and the area under a curve/rate graph in single variable integral calculus.
    4. Construct application models from word problems and use integrals and/or derivatives to investigate properties of the models in single variable integral calculus.
    5. Construct mathematical models from word problems in mathematical modelling.

    Prerequisites: MNTC P03 and MNTC P04

MNTC P06: Foundational Chemistry

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, basic organic chemistry, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and this course will refine their ability to communicate scientific information.

  • MNTC P06 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Tremblay, Eric

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Describe atomic structure and chemical bonding, and how they relate to the physical properties of ionic, molecular, covalent network, and metallic substances.
    2. Perform calculations to an adequate level of precision.
    3. Solve problems relating to the physical properties of gases.
    4. Apply standard chemistry nomenclature (IUPAC) in the context of describing chemicals (including organic compounds) and chemical reactions.
    5. Use stoichiometry to solve common chemistry problems.
    6. Use reduction and oxidation chemistry to describe a galvanic cell and other practical applications.
    7. Calculate reagent concentrations in solutions.
    8. Use the concept of chemical equilibrium to predict the direction of reactions.
    9. Solve simplified acid and base problems.

MNTC P07: Surveying Principles

This course introduces learners to the fundamental principles of surveying. Learners will develop transferable survey computation skills that can be applied using various technologies in diverse environments. In this course, learners will become familiar with differential leveling techniques and basic measurement of angles and distances including calculation techniques. Principles of error propagation and error analysis are also introduced. Finally, a study of modern survey equipment, related concepts and terminology, including Total Stations, Data Collectors, and GPS mapping, will provide learners with an understanding of the current technologies being used in industry today.

  • MNTC P07 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Bergeron, Pierre

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Produce elevations from differential leveling notes.
    2. Calculate coordinates and areas for survey control traverse.
    3. Assess measurement for error.
    4. Predict the 3-dimensional accuracy of GPS positions.
    5. Produce revised ground versus grid distances for construction layout purposes.
    6. Operate the main functions of Total Stations and Data Collectors
    7. Combine the main functions of Total Stations and Data Collectors in order to produce a pertinent report using previously gathered field data.

MNTC 307: Geomechanics and Ground Control

This course presents a basic introduction to the use of classical and geostatistical estimation techniques for mineral resource estimation. Students will learn to recognize the geological influences to ore body modelling, apply various estimation methods, produce mineralization reports, and classify the mineral resources and reserves according to accepted internationally recognized methods. The course also includes basic ore exploration and sampling concepts.

  • MNTC 307 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Cortolezzis, Donna

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Describe the basic principles of rock failures.
    2. Recognize appropriate field and laboratory investigation programs to define rock failure criteria.
    3. Analyze data from field and laboratory investigations to define the failure criteria
    4. Recognize numerical stress analysis models for excavation design
    5. Use various empirical/analytical design methods for excavations such as open stopes, pillars, and open pit slopes
    6. Evaluate appropriate support systems for specified ground conditions

    Prerequisites: MNTC 302, APSC 182
    Exclusions: MINE 325

MNTC 311: Ore Body Modelling and Resource Estimation

This course presents a basic introduction to the use of classical and geostatistical estimation techniques for mineral resource estimation. Students will learn to recognize the geological influences to ore body modelling, apply various estimation methods, produce mineralization reports, and classify the mineral resources and reserves according to accepted internationally recognized methods. The course also includes basic ore exploration and sampling concepts.

  • MNTC 311 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Lambden, Alan

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Identify an appropriate mineral deposit type, and use this to identify the geologic factors that control the spatial distribution of grades in the deposit.
    2. Compile and validate the data files and data bases required for mineral resource estimation.
    3. Statistically analyze and interpret grade distributions, scatterplots and spatial correlation.
    4. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of the three most common approaches to grade estimation: geostatistical kriging, inverse-distance interpolation, and the polygonal method.
    5. Formulate a set of resource estimation assumptions and parameters, use these to run software to create a resource block model, and then check the reliability of the resulting estimates.

    Prerequisites: MNTC 304, MNTC 305 or APSC 151
    Exclusions: MINE 467

MNTC 313: Introduction to Programming

Students will be introduced to the fundamental concepts of computer programming using both C/C++ and MATLAB. The course will teach computer programming with a focus on practical applications for analyzing data and solving practical mathematical problems. Topics will include basic components of a computer (both hardware and software), memory and variables, expressions, selection structures, loops, arrays, functions, and commonly used algorithms such as sorting and searching. At the end of the course, students will be able to apply computer programming skills to assist in both design and analysis for real-life engineering applications.

  • MNTC 313 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Sari, Asli

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Explain how software and hardware interact to link computer programming to actual machine operations.
    2. Implement the features of a programming language such as syntax.
    3. Transform logical relationships into computer programming elements such as expressions, selection statements, and loops.
    4. Use features such as arrays and functions to enhance the efficiency of computer programs.

    Prerequisites: MNTC P01
    Exclusions: APSC 143

MNTC 316: Ventilation and Hydraulics

This course will provide an overview of fluid mechanics in order to provide a solid foundation for mine ventilation and mine hydraulics. Students will be able to perform ventilation surveys, analyze existing ventilation networks and design new ventilation networks in accordance with mine regulations and design criteria. New technology for saving energy and reducing emissions will be explored. Mine hydraulics topics such as mine service water distribution, mine drainage and dewatering and backfill distribution will be discussed. Students will be able to perform pipe network analyses and select the appropriate pumps for these applications.

  • MNTC 316 Details

    Credits: 4.0
    Instructor: Hope, Natalie

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Describe fluid mechanics fundamentals.
    2. Explain ventilation surveys.
    3. Analyze ventilation networks (air flow quantity and pressure).
    4. Design primary and auxiliary mine ventilation systems in accordance with mine regulations and design criteria.
    5. Select appropriate ventilation infrastructure.
    6. Perform pipe network analyses.
    7. Select appropriate pumps.

    Prerequisites: MNTC 302, MNTC 304, and MNTC 305, or APSC 111, APSC 112, APSC 171, APSC 172, and APSC 174.
    Exclusions: MINE 339

MNTC 409: Mineral Economics

Mining companies develop projects and operate mines as part of a global minerals industry. This course first sets the global context, reviewing the history of mineral economics, the nature and components of mineral supply and demand, pricing and markets, and aspects of their role in the global economy. The impact of government policies and international treaties on mining companies and projects is discussed. Building blocks of relevant economic concepts and financial tools are reviewed and applied to structured problems. The estimation of mineral resources and mineral reserves, the feasibility assessment process, and the disclosure of the results of work in these areas under National Instrument 43-101, are reviewed. The valuation of companies and evaluation of projects is covered, as are approaches to addressing risk and uncertainty. Sources and types of funding for companies and projects are introduced. Throughout the course, ways in which sustainability is increasingly being reflected in activities studied in this course are highlighted.

  • MNTC 409 Details

    Credits: 3.5
    Instructor: Macauley, Doug

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Describe the nature and components of global minerals supply, demand, trade and price.
    2. Identify national and international policies, regulations and treaties relevant to the minerals industry.
    3. Solve structured problems using economic analysis concepts (e.g. time value of money, discounting) and financial analysis tools (e.g. Net Present Value (NPV), Internal Rate of Return (IRR), payback period).
    4. Describe the estimation of mineral resources and mineral reserves, the feasibility assessment process and different types of reports, and the disclosure of the results of work in these areas under National Instrument 43-101.
    5. Apply economic and financial tools to valuation of companies, evaluation of projects, and strategic planning.
    6. Discover how risk and uncertainty are addressed in the techniques and processes of mineral economics.
    7. Discover sources and types of equity and debt financing for mining companies and projects.
    8. Examine the impact of sustainability initiatives and frameworks on mining companies and projects, and ways in which sustainability is increasingly being reflected in activities studied in this course.

    Prerequisites: APSC 221 and MNTC 305, or permission of the Mining Department
    Exclusions: MINE 330

MNTC 413: Surface Mine Planning

This course presents a comprehensive overview of the principal components of surface mine design. Topics include pit limit analysis and economic optimization, haul road design, blast design, and basic stability calculations. Equipment selection and application and mine scheduling techniques will be introduced, including dragline applications. The focus will be on the practical application of design techniques to mine planning, and on the available equipment and methods for field monitoring to provide effective design feedback and support safe operations.

  • MNTC 413 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Ortiz, Julian

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Describe surface mining techniques
    2. Explain how the environment is impacted by surface mining
    3. Describe the difference between estimating and simulating an orebody block model. Calculate ore cut off grades given various constraints. Calculate bulk density.
    4. Apply pit limit analysis algorithms in two dimensions.
    5. Sequence blocks using constraints such as various slope stability angles, mining capacity and milling capacity.
    6. Design production rates for a surface mining operation. Relate production rates to mining and milling capacities.
    7. Describe mine planning fundamentals and formulate short-term mine plans. Relate capacity selection to market structure and economic considerations. Calculate whether blocks are ore or waste using the minimum loss or maximum profit formulas. Delineate dig limits and describe the relationship between dig limits and equipment size. Design a bed-blending operation. Reconcile actual to planned grades. Develop a gap management strategy.
    8. Select equipment for excavation, loading, hauling using the time value of money and compatibility to a proposed mine design.
    9. Describe the current state of automation for each type of equipment in open pit mining. Be able to assess the future trends of automated equipment. Describe support services needed and the impact automation will have on the workforce.
    10. Describe bench geometry and design benches in open pit mines. Solve slope stability problems including calculation of a safety factor.
    11. Identify sources of water in surface mines. Describe current dewatering strategies and design a dewatering circuit. Select the correct type and size of pumps based for a dewatering circuit.
    12. Critique haul road designs using best practices in safety and operational design. Describe the importance of haul roads, design and maintain haul roads.
    13. List the elements of open pit operating costs. Describe open pit capital costs. Evaluate the impact changing operating and capital costs have on equipment selection
    14. Analyze case studies using learning objectives 1 through 13.

    Prerequisites: MNTC 305, MNTC 307, MNTC 311, and MNTC 314 or permission of the department.
    Exclusions: MINE 341

MNTC 420: Physical Asset Management

This course represents an introduction to reliability and maintenance of mining-related equipment, encompassing both mobile fleets and static equipment, including processing plants. It introduces the primary types of maintenance policies and key performance indicators for reliability and maintenance. Analytical tools for resource allocation and prioritization, as well as an integrated methodology for developing maintenance strategies are covered.

  • MNTC 420 Details

    Credits: 3.0
    Instructor: Daneshmend, Laeeque

    Course learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course, learners should be able to:

    1. Explain qualitative and quantitative reliability and maintenance concepts including risk.
    2. Justify the selection of maintenance policies and their appropriate applications in mining.
    3. Explain the relationship between maintenance organizational structures and processes with respect to mining operations taking into account practical realities in the mining context.
    4. Design maintenance organizational structures including work-flow processes.
    5. Apply relevant analytical techniques for the prioritization of maintenance activities and resources; including Pareto analysis, Failure Mode Analysis, and Failure Rate curves.
    6. Select appropriate maintenance policies through a structured methodology (RCM), based on application of analytical techniques and incorporating costs.

    Prerequisites: MNTC 302 and MNTC 304 or APSC 171, APSC 172, and APSC 182

How to Apply

For Queen's students:

Current Queen’s students, including those from other faculties, can enrol through SOLUS.

Log into SOLUS

Last day to add a course: May 14

For all other applicants:

Non-Queen’s students can apply through Queen’s Online Application Portal.

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Application deadline is April 16

You can find more information about the registration process here.